Tag Archives: vendor events

Reserve your table Now!

When it comes to trade shows, there are a lot of people that you are competing with in order to get a table. For that reason, it’s important to reserve and pay for your table as soon as possible. But if they event is a few months in the future, you may be leery just in case something else comes up and you cannot attending. If this sounds like you, here are a few suggestions.

English: Table with marzipan sweets made by 'P...

English: Table with marzipan sweets made by (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Deadline                       

The first thing you may want to ask the coordinator is if there is a deadline for the first person to book the table. For instance, let’s say the event isn’t for 3 months; you may be able to hold the table until a month before the event without paying.   If this is the case, ask if you will be contacted if someone else wants to book so that you can get your payment in.

Refunds/Sell Table

Quite often, events will require you to pay for your table at whatever time you book it no matter how far out the event is. If it turns out you cannot attend, you can ask for a refund (but many places will not refund you unless they can fill your table easily) or you can see if a teammate wants it. If a teammate wants it, let the coordinator know that someone else will be coming in your place and that they are a member on your team. You can charge your teammate or just cover the cost yourself.

Waiting List

Sometimes the coordinator is willing to create a waiting list in case the first person has to cancel. This may also be because the payment from the first person is in the mail and has not arrived. If they put you on a waiting list, you can ask if the first person has paid or not. It’s possible that someone just requested the table last week and their payment is in transit so that person has the first dibs on the table. Do not push the coordinator too hard for information as they may decide just not to deal with you and not give you the table.

Why Mixing Up Personality Types at Trade Shows Can Help Sales

At trade shows, your team members are the embodiment of your company. Although your sales representatives are there to inform attendees about a product or service, the manner in which they do so will speak volumes about your company’s ethos, or guiding principles. Be sure to send your best people to staff your Trade Show Exhibits. Their knowledge of the business and their interactions with potential clients will do more to attract and repel sales than any infographic or promotional item ever could.

English: 2007 AutoTronics Taipei: Car Electron...

English: 2007 AutoTronics Taipei: Car Electronics Area. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

According to a 2013 Nielsen study, approximately half of all people surveyed said that they would be willing to spend more money on a product if they believed the company would use the extra money to improve society in some way. This study says a lot about the relationship between ethics and consumerism – people like to believe that they’re spending their money at ethical companies who are making the world a better place. It’s why McDonalds funds the Ronald McDonald house while being accused of not paying employees a living wage, and why Nike started the Nike Foundation after many years of sweat shops allegations. In both of these cases, companies are taking control of their ethos in the public eye. Fortunately, you don’t need to start a charity in order to capitalize on this mindset.

At trade shows, it is important to promote the idea that your company has both the best product and the best people. In order to do so, your representatives should be knowledgeable, personable, and diverse. Everyone is unique, and we all respond to situations and people differently. What some people may consider an enthusiastic and informative discussion with a vendor, others may perceive as a pushy sales pitch. Additionally, some individuals are more receptive to being approached by sales representatives than others. According to a recent study released by the Center for Exhibition Industry Research, more than 50% of men are comfortable talking with vendors they do and do not know, compared to 40% of women.

Sending a diverse range of personalities to represent your company at trade shows appeals your business to a larger audience, which will in turn increase sales. A booth manned by people who look and act the same subconsciously signals to the customer that product or service is only for people of a certain appearance and disposition. Avoid isolating customers and send the message that your business is for everyone. In order to appeal to the largest possible audience, your sales representatives should be as diverse and unique as your market.

Trade shows are great opportunities to increase brand awareness, interact with potential clients, and make direct sales. Make the most out of your trade show experience by diversifying your representatives’ personalities and appealing yourself to the largest possible audience.

Should You Sell at a Trade Show?

Let us assume that your company allows you to sell product at a trade show.  Should you actually do this or should you focus on showing what your company has to offer and get bookings and recruits instead?

Berry Vendor

Berry Vendor (Photo credit: La Grande Farmers’ Market)

I think the first thing you have to ask yourself is what you are trying to do with your business.    Are you comfortable and happy with the amount of bookings you have and just want to get rid of excess inventory?  Do you want to increase your monthly sales?  Do you want to grow your team bigger?   All of the answers to these can help to decide what to do.

Selling Inventory

Obviously if you are happy with your sales levels and just want to get rid of excess inventory, then you should sell product.  You can always take orders and work on getting bookings while you are there.  You can put up signs and notices about benefits of hosting a party and why you should join the company.

Increase Bookings

If you want to increase bookings, then you should set up your table in that method.  Bring product to show so people can see what you offer but focus on the benefits of hosting.  You could set up an area of the table that shows people what they would get in actual product when they have a party.  You can tell someone they get $40 which doesn’t mean much but if you show them what $40 gets them, it has more impact.  Put up a sign saying “Get all this for $10 by hosting a party!” and then include the breakdown of hostess credit and half off items.

Find Recruits

Just like trying to get bookings, you need to show people the benefits of becoming a consultant with your company.  Set up an area to show people what they get with their kit.  If they can earn it free, let them know what it takes and how to accomplish it.  Explain to them what they can earn.  You may want to put signs that say “Want a new car?  You can earn a car payment with just X amount of parties a week” or something similar.  It needs to catch their attention and draw them in.  Be prepared to answer questions about your own experiences.

I find that you concentrate and present yourself differently when you are simply selling product versus trying to get bookings and find recruits.  This is why it is important to know what you are trying to accomplish at a trade show.

 

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